Beyond its world-class golf, dining and shopping opportunities, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina attracts millions of visitors annually who come to enjoy the island’s beautiful, award-winning beaches.

Here are 5 great reasons to love Hilton Head beaches:

  1. Hilton Head beaches are subtropical and spacious.

With more than 12 miles of vast, pristine swaths of silky shores overlooking the Atlantic, you are sure to find a stretch of sand that is right for you – whether you’re looking to relax or recreate.

  1. Hilton Head beaches are public, plentiful and accessible.

While many Hilton Head homes and communities enjoy private beach “access,” the beaches of Hilton Head are public and the Town of Hilton Head Island offers public beach access at many convenient locations:

  • Alder Lane Beach Access, off South Forest Beach Drive
  • Coligny Beach Park, off Coligny Circle and near large public beach parking lot
  • Fish Haul Park, at the end of Beach City Road
  • Driessen Beach Park, at the end of Bradley Beach Road
  • Burkes Beach Access, at the end of Burkes Beach Road
  • Folly Field Beach Park, off Folly Field Road
  • Islanders Beach Park, off Folly Field Road – access is available with a Town of Hilton Head Island-issued annual parking pass.
  • Several Hilton Head beaches are equipped with special mats that make them wheelchair accessible: Alder Lane Beach, Coligny Beach Park, Driessen Beach Park, Folly Field Beach Park and Islanders Beach Park. Vacation Mobility Solutions offers wheelchair rentals on Hilton Head.
  1. Hilton Head beaches are ideal for relaxation and recreation.

Inspiring ocean views sooth the soul and the hard-packed sand is well-suited for walking, running, bike riding, swimming or lounging.

Coligny Beach, situated at the Beach House (a Holiday Inn resort), is home to fun water fountains for the kids and Hilton Head’s famous Tiki Hut, with live entertainment, beach volleyball and proximity to many shopping and dining opportunities.

Surfers and kiteboarders enjoy catching some waves and wind at Burkes Beach, while many families enjoy Folly Field, which offers a playground and restrooms.

  1. Hilton Head beaches are sustainable and rich with wildlife.

Hilton Head beaches are home to a variety of native plants and animals that are both interesting and integral to Hilton Head’s unique environment.

Birds, such as bald eagles, pelicans, piping plovers and sea gulls, dolphins, ghost crabs and Loggerhead sea turtles, which are protected, are just some of the creatures you’ll discover. Moon jellies often wash up on shore, but they are not considered dangerous or to have a noticeable sting.

You’ll also find pockets of dense vegetation and dunes, which provide a natural wildlife habitat and, like the turtles, are protected. Dogs enjoy romping about on the beaches of Hilton Head, too, and are permitted according to beach regulations.

  1. Hilton Head beaches are regulated and safe.

This may not sound fun, but the Town of Hilton Head Island has beach regulations in place in order to ensure safety and enjoyment for all beach goers. Alcoholic beverages, unauthorized vehicles, disturbing or removing wildlife (e.g., live sand dollars), and fires are among some of the fineable offenses.

Lifeguards are on duty in designated swimming areas and can provide information regarding weather, rip currents and more. Shore Beach Service provides the beach patrol for Hilton Head’s beaches, and also offers beach safety tips and beach equipment rentals, including umbrellas, chairs, kayaks and more.

 

You can additional find information regarding award-winning Hilton Head beaches online at HiltonHeadIslandSC.gov and HiltonHeadIsland.org.

 

Important Note Regarding Hilton Head’s “Beach Renourishment:”
In order to preserve Hilton Head Island beaches, and continue to provide residents and visitors with a uniquely beautiful and expansive shoreline, the Island engages in beach renourishment every several years. The current renourishment project commenced in June 2016, but the beaches will remain open. Visit the
beach renourishment project web page to learn more.

 

 

 

Follow Us On Twitter